Artificial Intelligence News for August 18 2017

Why I do not fear Artificial Intelligence | Carl Henrik Ek | TEDxKTH

Carl Henrik gives us a fascinating talk about human beings’ ability to reason under uncertainty and his view on intelligence. He tells us about the beauty and …

Why is the language of transhumanists and religion so similar?

At the same event, in New York, I introduced myself to a grey-haired computer scientist by saying that I was a researcher at the Faraday Institute for Science and Religion at the University of Cambridge. ‘ The religious reaction to AI was about as relevant as the religious response to renewable energy, he said – that is, not at all. The odd thing about the anti-clericalism in the AI community is that religious language runs wild in its ranks, and in how the media reports on it. The tech folk who also invoke these metaphors and tropes operate in overtly and almost exclusively secular spaces, where rationality is routinely pitched against religion. Humans are therefore faced with an invidious choice once they learn about Roko’s Basilisk: they can help to build the superintelligence, or face painful and unending perdition at the hands of a future, ultra-rational AI. Eliezer Yudkowsky, the founder of LessWrong, was so concerned by this train of thought and the angst it caused some members of his forum that he deleted the original post and banned all commentary about the Basilisk. The sticky ‘problem’ of the persistence of religion is a favourite discussion topic on rationalist websites. Adhering to a view of history as a teleological climb by humanity to greater and greater heights of rationality, they see religion as an irrational vestige of a more primitive mankind. Religion’s promise of heaven or another afterlife, they say, is a comfort that maintains humanity’s deathism and prevents it from working towards a better world in the here and now. Some transhumanists express admiration for new religions that manage to motivate their followers. It stands in contrast to an older, more cyclical model of time, in which ‘history waxes and wanes like the moon’, as the historian Keith Thomas puts it in Religion and the Decline of Magic. If time marches on, then of course religion becomes old, vestigial, to be replaced. Intriguingly, some transhumanists express admiration for new religions that have managed to attract and motivate their followers. The stories and forms that religion takes are still driving the aspirations we have for AI. What lies behind this strange confluence of narratives? The likeliest explanation is that when we try to describe the ineffable – the singularity, the future itself – even the most secular among us are forced to reach for a familiar metaphysical lexicon. The prospect creating an AI invites us to ask about the purpose and meaning of being human: what a human is for in a world where we are not the only workers, not the only thinkers, not the only conscious agents shaping our destiny.
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Re-think Customer Experience: Artificial Intelligence and …

As we enter a new phase of automation and Artificial Intelligence, we are looking at an incredibly exciting time for marketing and customer …
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Artificial or not, intelligence requires cleaned and …

For all the effort and investment that companies are now throwing into AI development, it will all go to waste if the data being used is bad
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Artificial Superintelligence Support

For every decision regarding how to train your AI or handle the bizarre requests of Silicon Valley residents, you can make just two possible choices.
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