Artificial Intelligence News for August 21 2017

Google Ventures: Artificial Intelligence(AI) Could Revolutionize Health Care and Biotech
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=trDzmENjfd8
Bill Maris, Google Ventures chief executive officer, comments on artificial intelligence’s impact on biotech, the prospects for Theranos and the venture capital …

Artificial Intelligence conversation questions

For general advice on using conversation topics, see our ESL conversation questions article. To add new questions to this page: click the edit tab above type your question into the appropriate section preceded by an asterisk click the Save page button at the bottom of the page At present, what activities are computers better at than humans? Which are humans better at than computers? Human intelligence itself is not really well understood. How would you define it? How does human intelligence differ from animal intelligence? How would you define Artificial Intelligence, or AI? Are computers just glorified adding-up machines or might they be capable of original thought? For a computer to pass the Turing Test, a human must be unable to tell whether he or she is having a conversation with a computer or another human. How close do you think computers are to passing this test? The objective of the Turing Test is to establish if a computer has real human-like intelligence. If a computer were to pass the test, would it really have demonstrated this ability? Computers get faster and better every year. Is it just a matter of time before they become more intelligent than humans? Is consciousness uniquely human? If a computer had real intelligence, should it be given the same rights and responsibilities as people? Would it be right to ever turn it off? Should we be worried about computers becoming the dominant species on the planet? Would they remain our faithful servants, treat us as pets, or exterminate us like cockroaches?
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Robot Revolution: Rise Of Artificial Intelligence Could …

A robot revolution could be coming ahead, with a new report warning that the rise of artificial intelligence could lead to mass unemployment as machines take over …
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Robotics, Artificial Intelligence and Automation

The use of robotics in the workplace is no longer a science fiction concept. Robotics is the fastest growing industry in the world, poised to become the largest in the next decade. As employers incorporate robotic technology into the workplace, they must also adapt their compliance systems to this unique and rapidly evolving industry. Employers in the robotics industry should prepare for the legislative and regulatory obstacles that could affect how they do business in the U.S. and abroad. Attorneys in Littler’s Robotics, Artificial Intelligence and Automation practice group regularly assist employers in the technology sector and employers that are integrating technological advances into their workplaces to navigate the complex and evolving terrain of employment and labor law. As the world’s largest law firm focusing solely on legal and regulatory issues affecting employers, Littler is positioned to help businesses confront the new challenges that robotics brings. Our Robotics practice group also works closely with Littler’s Workplace Policy Instituteâ„¢ to provide expert testimony and model policies on issues of greatest import to this industry. Attorneys in Littler’s Robotics practice group handle a broad spectrum of employment and labor issues, from workplace privacy to health and safety. Provide employment and labor law representation and compliance assistance to employers in the robotics industry and employers integrating robotics and AI systems into their workplaces in the U.S. and worldwide. Through Littler’s Workplace Policy Instituteâ„¢, provide model policies and expert testimony to legislatures, parliaments and regulatory agencies on employment and labor law compliance, challenges and practical recommendations on the adoption and implementation of workplace robotics. Provide a customized review of your robotics products and software to assess whether their use conflicts with workplace laws, and suggest compliance solutions. Examine how your products or software could be used to help users attain workplace compliance. Robotic exoskeletons or voice-activated software might be an appropriate reasonable accommodation for an individual with disabilities. The above is just a sampling of our experience representing robotics entities in employment and labor law matters. To learn more about the Robotics practice group, our specific experience, and how we can help you, please contact your Littler Attorney.
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Preparing for the Future of Artificial Intelligence

The Office of Science and Technology Policy has requested comments pertaining to the governance of artificial intelligence technologies. The Technology Policy Program of the Mercatus Center at George Mason University is dedicated to advancing knowledge of the impact of regulation on society. We write here to comment on the appropriate policy framework for artificial intelligence technologies at this nascent stage of their development and to make the case for prudence, patience, and a continuing embrace of “Permissionless innovation.” Permissionless innovation refers to the idea that “Experimentation with new technologies and business models should generally be permitted by default. Unless a compelling case can be made that a new invention will bring serious harm to society, innovation should be allowed to continue unabated and problems, if they develop at all, can be addressed later.” Policymakers may be tempted to preemptively restrict AI technologies out of an abundance of caution for the perceived risks these new innovations might seem to pose. An examination of the history of US technology policy demonstrates that these concerns can be adequately addressed without quashing a potentially revolutionary new industry. If policymakers wish to replicate America’s success with the Internet, they need to adopt a similar “Light-touch” approach for the governance of AI technologies. If one’s sole conception of a technology comes from Hollywood depictions of dystopian science fiction or killer robotic systems run amok, it is understandable that one might want to use the force of regulation to clamp down decisively on these “Threats.” But these fictional representations are just that: fictional. AI technologies are both much more benign and fantastic in reality. Some skeptics are already making the case for a preemptive regulation of AI technologies. They propose, among other things, the passage of broad-based legislation such as an “Artificial Intelligence Development Act,” as well as the creation of a federal AI agency or possibly a “Federal Robotics Commission” or “National Algorithmic Technology Safety Administration.” These proposed laws and agencies would establish a certification process requiring innovators to subject their technologies to regulatory review to “Ensure the safety and security of their A.I.” Or, at a minimum, such agencies would advise other federal, state, and local officials and organizations on how to craft policy for AI and robotics. AI technologies are already all around us-examples include voice-recognition software, automated fraud detection systems, and medical diagnostic technologies-and new systems are constantly emerging and evolving rapidly. Policymakers should keep in mind the rich and distinct variety of opportunities presented by AI technologies, lest regulations more appropriate for one kind of application inadvertently stymie the development of another. Policymakers must carefully ensure they have a full understanding of the boundaries and promises of all of the technologies they address. To the extent that policymakers wish to spur the development of a wide array of new life-enriching technologies, while also looking to devise sensible solutions to complex challenges, policymakers should consider a more flexible, bottom-up, permissionless innovation approach as the basis of America’s policy regime for AI technologies.
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