Artificial Intelligence News for August 27 2017

Will artificial intelligence help us solve every problem?

Artificial intelligence is going to change how we live to such a degree, that when we look back at driving a car, it will seem to us the way the Middle Ages looks …

You Can’t Invest in Artificial Intelligence Yet

If you aren’t up to speed on artificial intelligence yet, start here for a simple explanation of the technology. Predictions abound over how many jobs AI will inevitably steal, and perhaps the most ambitious estimate we’ve seen was in an article by the Guardian yesterday. Just how many years will it be before Nanalyze is just an AI machine which cranks out interesting articles about investing in disruptive technology and OTC scams stocks? One way to start hedging against the notion that our future progeny may not have access to gainful employment is to invest in the very same technology that will eventually render them jobless. We came across an article by TechCrunch yesterday titled “Investing In Artificial Intelligence” which is written by a VC investor who majored in Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine during his undergraduate at Oxford and who recently completed his Doctor in Philosophy in Cambridge. As you would guess, this 2,366 word article contains some fascinating facts and quality guidance about investing in artificial intelligence. The problem is, nothing in that article tells me how I can invest in artificial intelligence as a retail investor. Artificial intelligence is one of the most exciting and transformative opportunities of our time. From my vantage point as a venture investor at Playfair Capital, where I focus on investing and building community around AI, I see this as a great time for investors to help build companies in this space. That’s great, but what about the 98% of people reading the article who aren’t partners in a VC firm? What about investing in AI for retail investors? The reason the article doesn’t mention opportunities to invest in AI for retail investors is that there aren’t any at the moment. Sure, every media outlet seems to have published an article about how retail investors can gain access to this space such as Business Insider citing IBM, Microsoft, Google, and SAP as possible plays on the AI theme. Maybe the most compelling argument you could make would be for IBM based on their strong patent position in AI. While IBM is the leading holder of artificial intelligence patents, the portion of their $97 billion in 2014 revenues attributable to AI was next to nothing. The same thing holds true for Amazon and Twitter, two companies that Goldman analysts think will benefit from AI. The massive size of all the companies mentioned so far prevents any of them from ever becoming a pure play for investing in AI. While you can make all kinds of arguments about companies or industries that will benefit from AI, these are speculative bets as opposed to pure plays on the AI theme. Looking to buy shares in companies before they IPO? A company called Motif Investing lets you buy pre-IPO shares in companies that are led by JP Morgan.
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Artificial Intelligence News, Videos, Reviews and Gossip …

Shimon–a four-armed marimba playing robot–has been around for years, but its developers at Georgia Tech have recently taken this futuristic musical machine to the …
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Company Plans To Resurrect Humans With Artificial …

A company has announced its intention to resurrect the dead by storing their memories and using artificial intelligence to return them to life.
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artificial intelligence programming language

A computer language developed expressly for implementing artificial intelligence. In the course of their work on the Logic Theorist and GPS, two early AI programs, Allen Newell. A list is simply an ordered sequence of items of data. A computer scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. To produce the programming language LISP, which remains the principal language for AI work in the United States. The logic programming language PROLOG was conceived by Alain Colmerauer at the University of Aix-Marseille, France, where the language was first implemented in 1973. PROLOG was further developed by the logician Robert Kowalski, a member of the AI group at the University of Edinburgh. This language makes use of a powerful theorem-proving technique known as resolution. PROLOG can determine whether or not a given statement follows logically from other given statements. Given the statements “All logicians are rational” and “Robinson is a logician,” a PROLOG program responds in the affirmative to the query “Robinson is rational?” PROLOG is widely used for AI work, especially in Europe and Japan. Researchers at the Institute for New Generation Computer Technology in Tokyo have used PROLOG as the basis for sophisticated logic programming languages. These are in use on nonnumerical parallel computers developed at the Institute. Other recent work includes the development of languages for reasoning about time-dependent data such as “The account was paid yesterday.” These languages are based on tense logic. Which permits statements to be located in the flow of time.
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