artificial intelligence News for August 28 2017

2017 Healthcare Think Tank Session 3: Big Data and Artificial Intelligence

At 2017 DellEMC Healthcare Think Tank Session-3, a group of healthcare experts discuss and debate on how to exploit the cutting edge technologies such as …

Artificial Intelligence Now :: AI Now

As AI systems are employed in criminal justice, law enforcement, housing, hiring, lending, and many other domains, they have the potential to impact basic rights and liberties in profound ways. AI Now is partnering with the ACLU and other stakeholders to better understand and address these impacts.
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The Artificial Intelligence Revolution: Part 1

AI Caliber 1) Artificial Narrow Intelligence: Sometimes referred to as Weak AI, Artificial Narrow Intelligence is AI that specializes in one area. AI Caliber 2) Artificial General Intelligence: Sometimes referred to as Strong AI, or Human-Level AI, Artificial General Intelligence refers to a computer that is as smart as a human across the board-a machine that can perform any intellectual task that a human being can. AI Caliber 3) Artificial Superintelligence: Oxford philosopher and leading AI thinker Nick Bostrom defines superintelligence as “An intellect that is much smarter than the best human brains in practically every field, including scientific creativity, general wisdom and social skills.” Artificial Superintelligence ranges from a computer that’s just a little smarter than a human to one that’s trillions of times smarter-across the board. Where We Are Currently-A World Running on ANI. Artificial Narrow Intelligence is machine intelligence that equals or exceeds human intelligence or efficiency at a specific thing. Cars are full of ANI systems, from the computer that figures out when the anti-lock brakes should kick in to the computer that tunes the parameters of the fuel injection systems. Nothing will make you appreciate human intelligence like learning about how unbelievably challenging it is to try to create a computer as smart as we are. Moore’s Law is a historically-reliable rule that the world’s maximum computing power doubles approximately every two years, meaning computer hardware advancement, like general human advancement through history, grows exponentially. Raw computational power alone doesn’t make a computer generally intelligent-the next question is, how do we bring human-level intelligence to all that power? One example of computer architecture that mimics the brain is the artificial neural network. More extreme plagiarism involves a strategy called “Whole brain emulation,” where the goal is to slice a real brain into thin layers, scan each one, use software to assemble an accurate reconstructed 3-D model, and then implement the model on a powerful computer. If engineers get really good, they’d be able to emulate a real brain with such exact accuracy that the brain’s full personality and memory would be intact once the brain architecture has been uploaded to a computer. A group of computers would try to do tasks, and the most successful ones would be bred with each other by having half of each of their programming merged together into a new computer. We’d teach computers to be computer scientists so they could bootstrap their own development. A worldwide network of AI running a particular program could regularly sync with itself so that anything any one computer learned would be instantly uploaded to all other computers.
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Artificial intelligence in research | Science

5 days ago … We asked young scientists to describe an example of artificial intelligence or
machine learning in research, its broader implications in the field, …
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Artificial Intelligence Predicts Death to Help Us Live Longer

Researchers are now applying artificial intelligence, particularly machine learning and computer vision, to predict when someone may die. The ultimate goal is not to play the role of Grim Reaper, like in the macabre sci-fi Machine of Death universe, but to treat or even prevent chronic diseases and other illnesses. The latest research into this application of AI to precision medicine used an off-the-shelf machine-learning platform to analyze 48 chest CT scans. “Currently, most research into chronic disease and longevity requires long periods of follow-up to detect any difference between patients with and without treatment, because the diseases progress so slowly,” he explains. In January, researchers at Imperial College London published results that suggested AI could predict heart failure and death better than a human doctor. The research, published in the journal Radiology, involved creating virtual 3D hearts of about 250 patients that could simulate cardiac function. The researchers say the technology could be applied to predict outcomes of other heart conditions in the future. “The goal is to see if better predictions can guide treatment to help people to live longer.” These sorts of applications with AI to precision medicine are only going to get better as the machines continue to learn, just like any medical school student. Oakden-Rayner says his team is still building its ideal dataset as it moves forward with its research, but have already improved predictive accuracy by 75 to 80 percent by including information such as age and sex. “Predicting remaining life span for people is actually one of the easiest applications of machine learning,” Dr. Ziad Obermeyer tells STAT News. Obermeyer co-authored a paper last year with Dr. Ezekiel Emanuel in the New England Journal of Medicine called “Predicting the Future-Big Data, Machine Learning, and Clinical Medicine.” Preventing fatal accidents with AI? That’s what US and Indian researchers set out to do when they looked over the disturbing number of deaths occurring from people taking selfies. According to at least one paper published in Psychology Review earlier this year, the answer is a resounding “No.” Nearly nine out of 10 people in Germany and Spain who were quizzed about whether they would want to know about their future, including death, said they would prefer to remain ignorant.
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Artificial Intelligence: AI Reviews

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Artificial intelligence: A brief introduction to AI – BBC News

Imperial College London’s Prof Murray Shanahan provides a brief introduction to the topic of artificial intelligence.
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How Artificial Intelligence Will Redefine Management

The fact is, artificial intelligence will soon be able to do the administrative tasks that consume much of managers’ time faster, better, and at a lower cost. How can managers – from the front lines to the C-suite – thrive in the age of AI? To find out, we surveyed 1,770 managers from 14 countries and interviewed 37 executives in charge of digital transformation at their organizations. Picture how such technologies could support individuals and teams of managers in assessing decision consequences and exploring scenarios. Not only will AI augment managers’ work, but it will also enable managers to interact with intelligent machines in collegial ways, through conversation or other intuitive interfaces. Leaders should develop a diverse workforce and team of managers that balance experience with creative and social intelligence – each side complementing the other to support sound collective judgment.
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Latest Artificial Intelligence Project Topics & Ideas

Get latest list of artificial intelligence projects for your studies and research at NevonProjects. We provide the widest and most innovative artificial intelligence projects for students. These projects on artificial intelligence have been developed to help engineers, researchers and students in their research and studies in AI based systems. Browse through our list of latest artificial intelligence project ideas and choose the topic that suits you best. Go through our artificial intelligence project ideas and topics to find the AI project for your needs.
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