Artificial Intelligence News for June 29 2017

Are Artificial Intelligence(AI) and Robots Bubbles? Roomba Inventor Rodney Brooks

Rodney Brooks of Rethink Robotics about the technology required to make better robots, the dangers of overestimating AI’s capabilities, and the impacts of …

Artificial Intelligence Center @ SRI

SRI International’s Artificial Intelligence Center (AIC) is one of the world’s major
centers of research in artificial intelligence. Founded in 1966, the AIC has been a
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Essay: When Artificial Intelligence Gets Too Clever by Half

Just as we now have power to dictate the fate of less intelligent beings, so might such computers someday exert life-and-death power over us. That’s the analogy the superstar physicist Stephen Hawking used in 2015 to describe the mounting perils he sees in the current explosion of artificial intelligence. Allan Dafoe of Yale and Stuart Russell of Berkeley wrote an essay in MIT Technology Review titled “Yes, We Are Worried About the Existential Risk of Artificial Intelligence.” The computing giants Bill Gates and Elon Musk have issued similar warnings online. Perhaps the most influential case that we should be was made by the Oxford philosopher Nick Bostrom, whose 2014 book, “Superintelligence: Paths, Dangers, Strategies,” was a New York Times best seller. Bostrom defined superintelligence “As any intellect that greatly exceeds the cognitive performance of humans in virtually all domains of interest,” with the hypothetical power to vastly outmaneuver us, just like Hawking’s engineers. In the title of his eighth chapter, Bostrom asks, “Is the default outcome doom?,” and he suggests that the unnerving answer might be “Yes.” He points to a number of goals that superintelligent machines might adopt, including resource acquisition, self-preservation, and cognitive improvements, with potentially disastrous consequences for us and the planet. There’s also the possibility of an “Intelligence explosion,” where even a modestly capable general AI might undergo a rapid period of self-improvement in order to better achieve its goals, swiftly bypassing humanity in the process. Many critics are skeptical of this line of argument, seeing a fundamental disconnect between the kinds of AI that might result in an intelligence explosion and the state of the field today. Oren Etzioni, the CEO of the Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence, writes that many researchers place superintelligence “Beyond the foreseeable horizon,” and the philosopher Luciano Floridi argues in Aeon that we should “Not lose sleep over the possible appearance of some ultraintelligence we have no idea how we might begin to engineer it.” Roboticist Rodney Brooks sums up these critiques well, likening fears over superintelligence today to “Seeing more efficient internal combustion engines appearing and jumping to the conclusion that warp drives are just around the corner.” To the Microsoft researcher Kate Crawford, the “Hand-wringing” over superintelligence is symptomatic of AI’s “White guy problem,” an endemic lack of diversity in the field. Critics who emphasize the low probability of an intelligence explosion neglect a core component of Bostrom’s thesis. In the preface of “Superintelligence,” he writes that “It is no part of the argument in this book that we are on the threshold of a big breakthrough in artificial intelligence, or that we can predict with any precision when such a development might occur.” Instead, his argument hinges on the logical possibility of an intelligence explosion – something few deny – and the need to consider the problem in advance, given the consequences. A case in point is the new Leverhulme Center for the Future of Intelligence. Robert Hart is a researcher and writer on the politics of science and technology, with special interests in biotechnology, animal behavior, and artificial intelligence.
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Artificial intelligence: coming soon to a hospital near you

H. uman intelligence has long powered hospitals and health care. Advances in artificial intelligence are now making it possible to apply this form of computer-based “Thinking” to health care. There are, of course, standard communication protocols for teamwork in health care. To overcome this problem, my colleagues and I at the Florida Hospital Nicholson Center worked with a game development company called ARA/Virtual Heroes to create a virtual world in which a surgeon can practice team communication and leadership. A collection of rules, conditions, and scripts guide the surgeon through a scenario in the operating room and teach him or her which actions and decisions are correct and which ones aren’t. Robots like the da Vinci Surgical System provide a platform for translating a surgeon’s movements into precise actions with advanced instruments. Current robots are not aware of the anatomy they show the surgeon, the procedures they are being used to perform, or what the surgeon intends to do. Capabilities like those should greatly enhance the level of expertise brought into the operating room of the future, combining the skills and knowledge of the surgeon with the experience of thousands of his or her colleagues and the artificial intelligence of the world’s leading computer scientists. Hospitals know a great deal about individual patients, but very little about the aggregate health of their populations. Data mining and artificial intelligence have the potential to bring that information together into an integrated whole that can be analyzed to create a valuable picture of the health of any defined population while maintaining the anonymity of the individuals involved. They can address questions like which medical services are best suited to which communities in the city, or where are new disease outbreaks originating, or which communities would benefit from which health education programs? Government is increasingly holding local health care providers responsible for the health of the populations they serve. You can’t know what to provide if you don’t know the demographic and health makeup of your population. We know so little about the aggregate health of communities because there aren’t enough minds and hours to collect and analyze massive datasets. Big data and artificial intelligence will bring computer minds to these problems and significantly improve our ability to offer effective health care to individuals and communities.
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Best Artificial Intelligence Programs | Top Computer Science …

See the top ranked artificial intelligence programs at US News. Use the best
computer science rankings to find the right graduate program for you.
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Best Artificial Intelligence Software For Windows PC

Movies talk about Artificial Intelligence, Scientists are working on Artificial Intelligence projects. It is time to get a Artificial Intelligence Software For Windows PC. There are many kind of PC Assistant Software in the market. Here are best 5 Artificial Intelligence Software For Windows that you can try on your Windows PC easily. Although this is not a software application that you can install on your PC this is the best thing I have ever tried on this topic. If you are an Android User Here is a list of Best Artificial Intelligence Software for Android.
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Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence

AI2, founded by Paul Allen and led by Dr. Oren Etzioni, conducts high-impact research and engineering to tackle key problems in artificial intelligence.
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Evolving Artificial Intelligence – Will It Replace Human …

Did you knew about the Emerging Artificial Intelligence? Its going to shape the future of our Collective intelligence. Two months back I sat for the lecture
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Artificial intelligence will create world’s first trillionaire

“I am telling you, the world’s first trillionaires are going to come from somebody who masters AI and all its derivatives and applies it in ways we never thought of,” the Shark Tank billionaire said on Sunday at the SXSW Conference and Festivals in Austin. Faster than ever computer processors along with exponentially larger data sets are currently laying the cornerstone for the rapid development of artificial intelligence to new industries like insurance, according to Cuban. “Whatever you are studying right now if you are not getting up to speed on deep learning, neural networks, etc., you lose. We are going through the process where software will automate software, automation will automate automation,” said Cuban. At the same time, the billionaire warned that low-skilled employees had already been losing jobs to robots and automation. Cuban called for deeper consideration of ways to create good jobs for Americans who have been put out of work by robots and AI..
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