artificial intelligence News for September 08 2017

7 Days of Artificial Intelligence

A short film on the intelligence explosion. If God created his universe in 7 days; what could AI do to ours? The arrival of artificial intelligence promises the …

Artificial Brains – The quest to build sentient machines

Artificial brains are man-made machines that are just as intelligent, creative … but they are thought to include robotics and artificial intelligence.
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Artificial Intelligence | LinkedIn

View 319663 Artificial Intelligence posts, presentations, experts, and more. Get the professional knowledge you need on LinkedIn.
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Artificial intelligence – revolvy.com

Artificial intelligence ( AI ) is intelligence exhibited by machines . In computer science , the field of AI research defines itself as the study of ” intelligent …
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Even artificial intelligence can acquire biases against race and gender

When algorithms glean the meaning of words by gobbling up lots of human-written text, they adopt stereotypes very similar to our own. The work was inspired by a psychological tool called the implicit association test, or IAT. In the IAT, words flash on a computer screen, and the speed at which people react to them indicates subconscious associations. Both black and white Americans, for example, are faster at associating names like “Brad” and “Courtney” with words like “Happy” and “Sunrise,” and names like “Leroy” and “Latisha” with words like “Hatred” and “Vomit” than vice versa. They started with an established set of “Word embeddings,” basically a computer’s definition of a word, based on the contexts in which the word usually appears. So “Ice” and “Steam” have similar embeddings, because both often appear within a few words of “Water” and rarely with, say, “Fashion.” But to a computer an embedding is represented as a string of numbers, not a definition that humans can intuitively understand. Researchers at Stanford University generated the embeddings used in the current paper by analyzing hundreds of billions of words on the internet. Using it, Bryson’s team found that the embeddings for names like “Brett” and “Allison” were more similar to those for positive words including love and laughter, and those for names like “Alonzo” and “Shaniqua” were more similar to negative words like “Cancer” and “Failure.” To the computer, bias was baked into the words. All of these associations were found with the WEAT. The program also inferred that flowers were more pleasant than insects and musical instruments were more pleasant than weapons, using the same technique to measure the similarity of their embeddings to those of positive and negative words. The researchers then developed a word-embedding factual association test, or WEFAT. The test determines how strongly words are associated with other words, and then compares the strength of those associations to facts in the real world. It looked at how closely related the embeddings for words like “Hygienist” and “Librarian” were to those of words like “Female” and “Woman.” For each profession, it then compared this computer-generated gender association measure to the actual percentage of women in that occupation. So embeddings can encode everything from common sentiments about flowers to racial and gender biases and even facts about the labor force, the team reports today in. “When you’re training these word embeddings, you never actually specify these labels.” What’s not cool is how prejudiced embeddings might be deployed-when sorting résumés or loan applications, say. People have long suggested that meaning could plausibly be extracted through word cooccurrences, “But it was a far from a foregone conclusion,” says Anthony Greenwald, a psychologist at the University of Washington in Seattle who developed the IAT in 1998 and wrote a commentary on the WEAT paper for this week’s issue of. All of this work “Shows that it is important how you choose your words,” Bryson says.
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Putin says the nation that leads in AI ‘will be the ruler of the world’

Russian president Vladimir Putin has joined the war of words concerning the international race to develop artificial intelligence. Speaking to students last Friday, Putin predicted that whichever country leads the way in AI research will come to dominate global affairs. “Artificial intelligence is the future, not only for Russia, but for all humankind,” said Putin, reports RT. “It comes with colossal opportunities, but also threats that are difficult to predict. Whoever becomes the leader in this sphere will become the ruler of the world.” The development of artificial intelligence has increasingly become a national security concern in recent years. It is China and the US which are seen as the two frontrunners, with China recently announcing its ambition to become the global leader in AI research by 2030. Many analysts warn that America is in danger of falling behind, especially as the Trump administration prepares to cut funding for basic science and technology research. Although it’s thought that artificial intelligence will help boost countries’ economies in a number of areas, from heavy industry to medical research, AI technology will also be useful in warfare. Artificial intelligence can be used to develop cyber weapons, and control autonomous tools like drone swarms – fleets of low-cost quadcopters with a shared ‘brain’ that can be used for surveillance as well as attacking opponents. Both China and the US are currently researching this technology, and in his speech on Friday, Putin predicted that future wars would be fought by countries using drones. Recently, Elon Musk and 116 other technology leaders sent a petition to the United Nations calling for new regulations on how such AI weapons are developed. The group stated that the introduction of autonomous technology would be tantamount to a “Third revolution in warfare,” following the development of gunpowder and nuclear weapons. Putin noted that Russia did not want to see any one country “Monopolize” the field, and said instead: “If we become leaders in this area, we will share this know-how with entire world, the same way we share our nuclear technologies today.” China, Russia, soon all countries w strong computer science. Competition for AI superiority at national level most likely cause of WW3 imo.
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Google building artificial intelligence team in Beijing

Despite being all but locked out of China, Google is ramping up efforts to tap a vital technology resource in the country: engineering talent. The US tech giant is advertising for artificial-intelligence experts in Beijing, where it has expanded rapidly in the past few years. Google hinted in May, at an AI summit near Shanghai, that it was looking to set up its first China-based AI research team. The move pits Google in the race for talent against domestic group Baidu, which is also headquartered in Beijing’s northwestern tech village and has been stepping up its own efforts to hire AI researchers in Beijing and Silicon Valley. “Google’s recruiting creates additional pressures for ,” said Mark Natkin of Beijing-based tech research firm Marbridge Consulting. Although Google’s search engine has been blocked in China since 2010, the company has maintained a presence in the country and has made progress in mending relations, most recently by collaborating with local government on the AI summit in the town of Wuzhen. It has relaunched Google Translate as a Chinese-language mobile app, and earlier this year a senior official told the Financial Times that relations with Google were improving. Its Google Play app store is blocked in China – home to a third of the world’s users of Google’s Android smartphone operating system. For its part, China’s government considers technological innovations such as AI key to reviving its slowing economy, and has outlined plans to become the world’s premier AI innovation hub by 2030. China has the benefit of huge pools of personal data to feed into AI research, and a vast market for AI applications for its smartphone-savvy consumers. Experts say it lags behind the US in fundamental AI research. Four of 20 positions being advertised by Google in Beijing are for its machine learning programme – part of its AI research initiative – and require expert qualifications, such as those equivalent to an assistant professor’s. Google’s more than 600 employees in mainland China include an advertising sales team, where business is booming as a result of Chinese companies’ desire to attract foreign customers, and engineers working on Google’s still-blocked search engine. Google declined to make any immediate comment on its AI hiring plans.
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