artificial intelligence News for September 10 2017

Artificial Intelligence Body Gesture Detection in “Nobody” Performed by Korean Wonder Girl
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PoyTTxClPto
Artificial Intelligence is a new art form. Machine Learning Body Gesture Detection in live performance.

Sustainability and artificial intelligence lab

Sustainability and artificial intelligence lab …
more…

Artificial Intelligence in Medicine – CHOC Children’s

Artificial Intelligence in Medicine: Analytics and Algorithms, Big Data, Cloud and Cognitive Computing, and Deep Learning in Medicine and Healthcare
more…

Artificial Intelligence:Artificial intelligence

Artificial Intelligence is considered the development of machines such as robots and security systems to perform the job of humans. Who would have thought 60 years from then that the same computer would be perfected beyond leaps and bounds and be used to control other machines, as well as be part of day to day living? In 1956, John McCarthy, considered the father of Artificial Intelligence, organized a conference where intellectuals gathered to learn of this phenomenon. Today artificial intelligence is used in our homes and sophisticated establishments such as military bases and the NASA space station. There are many advantages and disadvantages of the use of artificial intelligence in business and in our day to day lives. Understanding complex software can be made in to easy-to-understand types with the aid of artificial intelligence.
more…

“Artificial intelligence is the future, not only for Russia but for all humankind,” he said, via live video beamed to 16,000 selected schools. Putin’s advice is the latest sign of an intensifying race among Russia, China, and the US to accumulate military power based on artificial intelligence. Technologies such as software that can sift intelligence material or autonomous drones and ground vehicles are seen as ways to magnify the power of human soldiers. “The US, Russia, and China are all in agreement that artificial intelligence will be the key technology underpinning national power in the future,” says Gregory C. Allen, a fellow at nonpartisan think tank the Center for a New American Security. Russia lags behind China and the US in sophistication and use of automation and AI, but is expanding its own investments through a military modernization program begun in 2008. The government’s Military Industrial Committee has set a target of making 30 percent of military equipment robotic by 2025. “Russia is behind the curve-they are playing catchup,” says Samuel Bendett, a research analyst who studies the country’s military at the Center for Naval Analyses. The AI race among the world’s three largest military powers differs from earlier competitions like those to deploy nuclear weapons or stealth technology because much artificial intelligence technology can be used for both commercial and military applications. Many recent advances in developing and deploying artificial intelligence emerged from research from companies such as Google. China’s AI strategy attempts to directly link commercial and defense developments in AI. For example, a national lab dedicated to making China more competitive in machine learning that opened in February is operated by Baidu, the country’s leading search engine. Another partner in the project is Beihang University, a leading center in military drones blocked from exporting certain items by the US Department of Commerce due to national security concerns. The Pentagon plans to boost spending on its DIUx project, created by the Obama administration to help smaller tech companies partner with the military. Bendett of the Center for Naval Analyses says Russia has demonstrated in recent conflicts in Syria and Ukraine that it can do much even without the best technology. The AI arms race may bring new technologies to the world’s largest militaries, but many dynamics of international power could be the same.
more…

Reshaping Business With Artificial Intelligence

Pioneers are 12 times more likely to understand the process for training algorithms, 10 times more likely to understand the development costs of AI-based products and services, and 8 times more likely to understand the data that’s needed for training AI algorithms. Most organizations represented in the survey have little understanding of the need to train AI algorithms on their data so they can recognize the sort of problem patterns that Airbus’s AI application revealed. Less than half of respondents said their organization understands the processes required to train algorithms or the data needs of algorithms. Many Pioneers already have robust data and analytics infrastructures along with a broad understanding of what it takes to develop the data for training AI algorithms. Only one-quarter of Investigators have made significant investments in AI technology, the data required to train AI algorithms, and processes to support that training. One misunderstanding is that sophisticated AI algorithms alone can provide valuable business solutions without sufficient data. Some forms of data scarcity go unrecognized: Positive results alone may not be enough for training AI. Citrine Informatics, a materials-aware AI platform helping to accelerate product development, uses data from both published experiments and unpublished experiments through a large network of relationships with research institutions. Sophisticated algorithms can sometimes overcome limited data if its quality is high, but bad data is simply paralyzing. We’re able to, with each project, add more value and more business content to that data lake. Companies sometimes erroneously believe that they already have access to the data they need to exploit AI. Data ownership is a vexing problem for managers across all industries. Even if the organization owns the data it needs, fragmentation across multiple systems can hinder the process of training AI algorithms. A big component of what we do is dealing with unstructured data, such as text mining, and analyzing enormous quantities of transaction data, looking at patterns. Training AI algorithms involves a variety of skills, including understanding how to build algorithms, how to collect and integrate the relevant data for training purposes, and how to supervise the training of the algorithm. Ensuring data privacy depends on having strong data governance practices.
more…

Artificial Intelligence Is Poised to Revolutionize Warfare

AI will likely to have as big an impact on military affairs as the invention of nuclear weapons, computers, or the airplane, according to Gregory Allen, adjunct fellow in the technology and national security program at the Center for a New American Security. Musk’s warning followed a statement by Russian President Vladimir Putin, who told a group of students on September 1 that he believes mastery of AI could result in no less than world domination. Putin envisioned a future in which wars are fought by vast armies of drones in a variety of forms, from tanks and fighter jets to helicopter gunships. “Wars may end when all the drones on one side are destroyed by the drones on the other side,” he said. China’s plan, a translation of which was published by the think tank New America, aims to “Strengthen a new generation of AI technology as a strong support to command and decision-making, military deduction, defense equipment, and other applications,” as well as “Promote all kinds of AI technology to become quickly embedded in the field of national defense innovation.” Putin compared the disruptive potential of AI to nuclear power and pledged that if Russia became the global leader in AI, it would share the technology with other countries. “Artificial intelligence isn’t just the future of Russia, it’s the future of all humanity,” Putin said. “These can be weapons of terror, weapons that despots and terrorists use against innocent populations, and weapons hacked to behave in undesirable ways.” Researchers studying the issue point to a wide variety of ways artificial intelligence could change the nature of conflict. Allen of the Center for a New American Security was lead author of a 132-page report published in July arguing that the impact of artificial intelligence will be deeply transformative. As costs drop precipitously for drones, militaries may produce vast swarms of small, cheap artificially intelligent attack robots. “For the price of a single high-end aircraft, a military could acquire one million drones,” the report says. The proliferation of millions of smaller, artificially intelligent drones, the report’s authors warned, threatens US national security. “I advocate keeping artificial intelligence away from the nuclear arsenal,” Allen said.
more…