automation News for August 29 2017

The last job on Earth: imagining a fully automated world | Guardian Animations

Machines could take 50% of our jobs in the next 30 years, according to scientists. Subscribe to The Guardian â–» http://is.gd/subscribeguardian While we can’t …

Operations Management Suite–Automation & Control | Microsoft

Use across on-premises and the cloud. Use familiar PowerShell skills to
automate complex and repetitive tasks. Extend cloud automation capabilities to
your …
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21st Century Automation: Is This Time Truly Different?

Of course this time is different; every time is different. Because if robots and AI replace people for many of the things we do today, the new fields we create will be built on the huge number of people those robots and AI systems made available. The real questions are what the intervening period of dislocation looks like, who gets hurt the hardest, and what the short-term political ramifications of this dynamic transformation means for the people experiencing those changes first hand. To answer those questions, it might be worthwhile to examine what things looked like the last time people thought “This time, things are different.” People often pay homage to that era as the point at which everything got better for most people. A closer examination of the early days of industrialization might lead us to hope that this time is different. This period saw unprecedented social disruption, stagnant wages, uncomfortable adjustments to civic life, and greater environmental pollution for the people living through it. Quality of life and overall living standards during this time have been a hotly debated topic. The industrial revolution made people better off, but about when. Echoed and expanded on this point, arguing that “While the Industrial Revolution ultimately led to big increases in wealth, progress was unsteady. For much of the period, the average person was not reaping the benefits of economic change.” For example, much of the early growing pains in Britain were the result of mass influxes of people into metropolitan centers. Charles Hall wrote “The Effects of CIvilization on the Peoples in European States” in 1805, criticizing what he viewed as capitalism’s negative effects on the working poor. What happens when people start identifying robots and technology, not the Chinese, as the cause of their financial woes? While the long term vision of technological progress looks bright, what costs might the world suffer in 10, 20, or 50 years if we fail to address emerging concerns? Article concluded, “[e]conomic history is not just about hard economics, but also about how people experience economic change. ” How people experience those changes will dramatically affect how they perceive the nature of progress.
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VMware vRealize Automation Cloud Automation Software

vRealize Automation enables IT Automation through the creation and
management of personalized infrastructure, application and custom IT services (
XaaS).
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In Ground Pool & Backyard Automation Systems – Hayward Pool …

Hayward Pool Products specializes in In Ground Pool & Backyard Automation
Systems. Click here to view our automation products.
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Automation, Inc. | Manufacturers Listing

Alphabetical listing of manufacturers represented by Automation, Inc. You may also download a PDF linecard from the links on the right.
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Control Systems for Home Automation, Campus … – Crestron

Crestron Electronics Inc. At Crestron, we build the technology that integrates technology. Our automation and control solutions for buildings and homes let people …
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Will Automation Take Our Jobs?

Advances in data mining, machine vision, artificial intelligence and other technologies could, they argued, put 47 percent of American jobs at high risk of being automated in the years ahead. Loan officers, tax preparers, cashiers, locomotive engineers, paralegals, roofers, taxi drivers and even animal breeders are all in danger of going the way of the switchboard operator. Since the end of the Great Recession, job creation has not kept up with population growth. What kinds of workers are being sidelined, and why? Could they get new jobs with the right retraining? Again, we do not know. In 2013 Brynjolfsson told Scientific American that the first step in reckoning with the impact of automation on employment is to diagnose it correctly-“To understand why the economy is changing and why people aren’t doing as well as they used to.” If productivity is no longer a good proxy for a vigorous economy, then we need a new way to measure economic health. In a 2009 report economists Joseph Stiglitz of Columbia University, Amartya Sen of Harvard University and Jean-Paul Fitoussi of the Paris Institute of Political Studies made a similar case, writing that “The time is ripe for our measurement system to shift emphasis from measuring economic production to measuring people’s well-being.” An IRL School report last year called for statistical agencies to capture more and better data on job market churn-data that could help us learn which job losses stem from automation.
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Automation Engineer Jobs | CareerBuilder

Automation Engineer Our Steel Industry client is a producer of steel tubular goods and currently it is seeking a new Automation Engineer. This company was recently …
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