small business News for September 15 2017

Screw the Guru – How Small Business Equals Big Money $$

I’m not your Guru-but I do know the Keys to massive success. How small business can create big profits with the LEAST amount of Effort. ITS NOT A SECRET!

Small Business Space

Your Small Business Space Specialists. Property Management and Development Services in the Atlanta area since 1980. Locations in North Metro Area. Simplistic Approach …
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Small Business Assistance Office / Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development

Minnesota Department of Administration: Materials Management Division Vendors interested in doing business with the state of Minnesota must register through the Supplier Portal, which is part of the state’s new accounting and procurement system. Metropolitan Economic Development Association MEDA hosts the Minnesota Procurement Technical Assistance Center that helps all Minnesota businesses pursue government procurement opportunities. Far from generic advice, our business guidebooks are written specifically for companies that will be doing business in Minnesota and operating under Minnesota laws and regulations. Our Guide to Starting a Business in Minnesota is the most comprehensive reference of its kind and a must read for anyone contemplating the startup or purchase of an existing business. Small Business Notes is a monthly newsletter that provides timely, accurate and useful information on topics of interest to small businesses in Minnesota.
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The State of Small Business Marketing in 2016

The result is Constant Contact’s “State of Small Business Marketing Annual Report,” which paints a full picture of small business marketing in 2015 and the trends that will impact your business this year. Despite defined economic challenges, small business owners are optimistic about 2016. While time-tested channels like email marketing and websites remain the “Go-to” marketing channels, be on the lookout for more use of video and messaging apps. Of course, it’s truly your passion that sets your business apart – but looking at data and industry trends can help steer your strategy in the right direction. Take a look and let us know if your small business experience matches what our data is saying.
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Small Business Nutrition Labeling Exemption Guidance

Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations 101.9(j)(1) and 21 CFR 101.9(j)(18) outline the requirements for a small business nutrition labeling exemption for foods. The small business nutrition labeling exemption requirements for dietary supplements are outlined in 21 CFR 101.36(h)(1) and 21 CFR 101.36(h)(2). The nutrition labeling exemptions for low-volume products found in 21 CFR 101.9(j)(18) and 21 CFR 101.36(h)(2) apply if the person claiming the exemption employs fewer than an average of 100 full-time equivalent employees and fewer than 100,000 units of that product are sold in the United States in a 12-month period. If any nutrient content claim, health claim, or other nutrition information is provided on the label, or in labeling or advertising, the small business exemption is not applicable for a product. If your firm manufactures all products that it sells, place a check mark after “Manufacturer.” 12-Month Time Period for which Firm is Claiming an Exemption: Enter the specific time period for which you are requesting an exemption for your products. Product: Under the column for product, enter the name, including the brand name, for each product for which your firm is claiming an exemption. In considering whether products have similar preparation methods, consider all steps that go into the preparation of the products, from the initial formulation steps to any finishing steps; for example, products with different ingredients would be considered different food products and counted separately in determining the number of units. No. of Units: Provide the approximate total number of units of the various package sizes of the product sold in the United States in the 12-month period preceding that for which the nutrition labeling exemption is claimed. For a new product, provide an estimate of the number of units of the product expected to be sold in the United States in the 12-month period for which you are claiming an exemption. The letter “A” is used to designate the firm submitting the notice if it is the manufacturer of the product. Name and Address of Manufacturer(s), Distributor(s), or Importer(s) of Products in Item 6 if Different From Firm Claiming the Exemption: If the firm submitting the notice is not the manufacturer of the product, use the letter from item 7 that corresponds to the name and address of the manufacturer, distributor, or importer of the products for which an exemption is being claimed if they are different than the firm claiming the exemption. If the name of the manufacturer is unknown, provide the name of the firm from which the product is purchased. The individual signing the notice will commit to notifying the Office of Nutritional Products, Labeling and Dietary Supplements when the average number of full-time equivalent employees or total number of units of products sold in the United States by the firm exceed the applicable numbers for the time period for which the exemption is being claimed.
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Small Business Majority

A thriving small business ecosystem is central to creating a dynamic and inclusive American economy. Small Business Majority advocates for policy solutions that create a strong, job-creating economy for all and provides education and resources to entrepreneurs to promote small business growth and prosperity. We conduct extensive research on the attitudes and concerns of small business owners and freelancers and communicate our findings and message directly to stakeholders and through the media. We regularly engage our network of 55,000 small business owners and work with more than 1,000 business groups across the country on issues including access to capital, healthcare, taxes, retirement, paid leave and other policies directly impacting entrepreneurship. Policy & advocacy: We develop and support policies that benefit the entire small business ecosystem-ranging from boosting access to responsible capital, ensuring affordable access to quality healthcare, and growth-oriented equitable tax and employment policies. Our small business owners speak out publicly, sharing their unique personal stories about why they support such policies and how they will be beneficial to their bottom line. We participate in coalitions working to enact such policies, providing the small business perspective and effective messaging. Research: Working with professional polling firms, we conduct scientific surveys of small business owners on a variety of issues to inform our policy positions and proposed solutions. Spokespeople: We recruit, train and deploy small business owner spokespeople to share their personal perspectives on issues of importance to small businesses. Media: We elevate the small business voice in the public sphere by sharing the results of our research with the media and putting a real small business face on the issues by having our small business spokespeople perform media interviews and place letters to the editor and op-eds in well-respected news outlets. Entrepreneurship Program: We provide a suite of educational programs and resources to small business owners, their employees and self-employed entrepreneurs to empower them to start and grow their enterprises and maximize their economic prosperity. In-person and online educational seminars: These events educate small business owners, small business employees and the self-employed on a variety of practical business topics and pertinent policy issues: access to capital, healthcare, retirement/asset building and workforce/employment issues. Small business outreach: We use an array of channels to regularly engage our network of small business owners and organizations. Online resources: We have developed several websites to provide on-demand information for small business owners on a host of topics, including access to capital, retirement security and healthcare and other workforce benefits.
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Small Business Development Center

From humble beginnings in 1979, the Saint Francis University Small Business Development Center today is one of the key players in the economic development of the six counties served by the Center. The Center currently employs four and has seven students working for it as well. “The Small Business Development Center is a team of professionals enabling small businesses to start, grow and prosper by providing quality services through education, research and consultation that promotes regional economic progress.” This mission is shown in the quality of work done both with existing and prospective small business owners. Some of the key impacts of the Center include the following. In 2013, the Saint Francis University SBDC was awarded the “Happy Client” award for having the highest client satisfaction rating among all the SBDCs in Pennsylvania. The Saint Francis University SBDC has also been recognized for its use of students at the Center. SBDC staff also exceeds the annual professional development requirements established for staff. Every staff member obtains training in a variety of areas both in their area of expertise but in other small business areas which broadens their breadth of knowledge. The Saint Francis University SBDC looks forward to working with many other small businesses and entrepreneurs over the next thirty-five years. The Saint Francis University Small Business Development Center has helped businesses in the Southern Alleghenies region start, grow and prosper for more than thirty-five years. The SBDC is one of 18 small business development centers in Pennsylvania and is an accredited affiliate of the national network of Small Business Development Centers. Whatever challenge faces your business, a consultant from the SBDC is ready to meet with you individually to help you launch your business, discuss your existing business plan, or help develop the strategies you need to meet your goals. Funding support and resources are provided by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania through the Department of Community and Economic Development; through a cooperative agreement with the U. S. Small Business Administration, and through support from Saint Francis University. All opinions, conclusions or recommendations expressed are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the SBA. SBDC services are not available to individuals or entities that have been debarred or suspended by the federal government.
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